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AP/Summary Synthesis

As previously discussed in my applied project post, I am working on the topic of art and society. My goal has been to find out how and why individuals use art to channel their creativity through communities for example; my local museum, my town, and my social media. 

For this project, I helped the Director at the Museum of the White Mountains develop a show scheduled to be on view for February 2020. This exhibition will include a plethora of work from northern New Hampshire; our high schools, various colleges, and community education students. The goal of the show overall is to bring surrounding towns together as a whole with young adults artwork showing that fresh perspective that I focused on in my applied project. Pulling information from my research article I was able to further develop the text pieces and communicate better overall to the contributors of this upcoming exhibition. The show description describes how art continues to serve a central purpose in our society and is integral to everyday life and education. My main focus I want to see happen is students to taking the time to submit work to shows in their community. I want young adults to see the impact their art has

There are so many aspects of what I get out of this project. I have gained so much experience already with seeing the behind the scenes of exhibition work. I challenged myself to use every aspect of my IDS major. While working in all these different community sections I was able to pair art and sociology. Being impressionable is the biggest part of linking sociology and art because of the impact you have on people. Art is interpretive and in a way lends itself easier to more sociological and psychological aspects. 

This whole experience has opened my eyes to the many career paths this degree can lead me to. Looking back on my lifework post, I feel as though I have gained an even stronger connection to my goals as I move forward with my journey. Art and society have never been closer connected and in a way one in the same in my mind. Creativity in a community is art even if it isn’t traditional art and that’s part of what I believe makes art so beautiful.

The Impact of the Arts in Rural Communities: Knowing Your Audiences

 

The research articles that I chose show the impact of the arts in rural communities. My goal over the project was to find out how and why individuals use art to channel their creativity through communities for example; my local museum, my town, and my social media. I wanted to explore how art help gains a stronger sense of community. In the world we are in today; we are constantly changing, evolving, connecting into whatever we feel is next. Especially now in rural NH, it seems that more communities are looking to expand their outreach and through the use of art and creativity however that takes shape. Communities are willing to change and adapt as well as the artists along with them and the two have what I believe is correlated relationship.

Why do the arts matter?

Based off of general observation, people in our society seem to have an overall appreciation for the arts. In most cases I studied the general public usually participate in artistic events by either making, viewing, or even support the functions financially. Arts-based disciplines are multifaceted (Skippington 2016). Art isn’t just events in museums or concerts, but is all around us. Art depicts the human experience as a whole, whether is a typical art form or not does not matter in a way.

By simply introducing and mixing the arts into our lives more, we are engaging in not just the arts, but together. The arts acts as an aide and helps foster a community through creativity. By thinking creatively, we have the capabilities to make improvements and have positive interactions that impact our community. Artists and art organizations are an important resource in our path to build stronger connections. These art programs tend to help develop critical skills to function in our society. Skills you develop just to name a few are critical thinking, communication, social skills, focus, and discipline.

The impact of the arts in rural locations

Based off of the definition provided by the national endowment for the arts; “Rural” is defined as geographic areas encompassing all population, housing, and territory not included in an “urban” area. Something that we seem to not highlight is how the arts play a crucial role in rural locations. The NEA provided reports showing that Arkansas; Mississippi; New Hampshire; West Virginia; and Maine contributed between $2 billion and $3 billion in art programs to their economies in 2015. Arts organizations in rural communities provide the community with business opportunities and attractions. For example rural counties host an art event; this provides more in terms of scenic appeal, recreational activities, and general interests to tourists. Because of this,visitors and even locals seem to spend more time participating in these community activities. According to the national endowment for the arts (NEA), the arts nationally contributed $763.6 billion to the U.S. economy in 2015. The NEA also reports how 31% of the rural participants are willing to travel much farther than urban participants which are only at 19%. The art organizations that attract a non local audience, are raised higher than the urban organizations. As shown on the Arts and economic prosperity; Art and cultural events alone, contributed $764 billion to the economy in 2015, including a $21 billion international trade. 

Promoting the arts in a community: multiple levels of marketing

It is clear that the arts thrive in community involvement, businesses, and organizations. It shows that those that work to promote and encourage the arts that they thrive in return. By attending these events and participating, we are creating a deeper sense of place for ourselves. According to a local museum director in a rural NH community, “In order to promote the arts, you must provide opportunities for community gathering.”  Some opportunities are events, workshops, presentations, etc. Another typical way to promote is by spreading around the visuals and compelling texts throughout the community. All these ways of promoting and integrating are vital when projects are being co-created. 

Creating an exhibit for rural audiences:

When it involves planning art associated events, directors take the concept process all the way into the little details. The title and theme/showcase concept has to connect without delay to surrounding communities ideals. The name and short description used in marketing has to suggest that there can be something the audience will really click with. If the community displays no interest in the description then it is much less probable to succeed. Therefore, it’s imperative you know your audience.

 When choosing formats for presentation for rural audiences, don’t forget what are the smoothest methods to inform the stories within the event/exhibit. Include all senses, all types of media and don’t forget to consider all learning patterns or styles.

 

Connecting communities to content:

If you deliberately create a pathway through the physical experiences, even with tough or complex materials. A goal to keep in mind is that the director/ host of the event should establish a balance of statistics, experience, and proposal. My local museum director discusses how she likes visitors to feel that she planned what the exhibit can do for them. By doing so, the visitors can leave with inspiration, further research, things needed that they can participate in afterwards.

 

Conclusion

Individuals seem to use art to channel their creativity, but that creativity as I’ve said is all around us. Community and Art share a beautiful relationship thriving off of one another. This relationship is evident in the world we are in today, if you look around we have more artistic expressionism than ever. This rise as I’ve said is most evident in rural NH, where bringing people who are more spread out and keep to themselves is hard to do. Communities are showing that they are willing to change in order to create what truly defines a community versus a town. 

 

“The Unique Challenges of Investigating Rural and Remote Communities.” Harnessing the Bohemian: Artists as Innovation Partners in Rural and Remote Communities, by PETER SKIPPINGTON, ANU Press, Australia, 2016, pp. 113–120. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1q1crpj.13.

 

Ap Summary Draft

As previously discussed in my applied project post, I am working on the topic of art and society because I want to find out how and why individuals use art to channel their creativity.

For this project, I helped the Director at the Museum of the White Mountains develop a show scheduled to be on view for February 2020. This exhibition will include a plethora of work; work from northern New Hampshire’s high school, college, and community education students. The goal of the show overall is to bring surrounding towns together as a whole with young adults artwork. The show description describes how art continues to serve a central purpose in our society and is integral to everyday life and education.

In terms of what I get out of this project, I have gained so much experience with seeing how an exhibition goes underway before even being announced to the public. I was able to incorporate every aspect of my major into my work, which personally validates the importance of pairing of art and sociology together. I also was able to pull information from my research article to further develop the text pieces and to communicate properly to the contributors of this upcoming exhibition.

This whole experience has opened my eyes to the many career paths this degree can lead me to. Looking back on  my lifework post, I feel as though I have gained an even stronger connection to my goals as I move forward with my journey. 

Research Article Draft

the Impact of the arts in Rural Communities: Knowing Your Audiences

The research articles that I chose show the impact of the arts in rural communities, the goal was to find out how and why individuals use art to channel their creativity. I wanted to explore how art help gains a stronger sense of community. In the world we are in today; we are constantly changing, evolving, connecting into whatever we feel is next. Especially now in rural NH, it seems that more communities are looking to expand their outreach and through the use of art and creativity. Communities are willing to change and adapt as well as the artists along with them.

Why do the arts matter?

Based off of general observation, people in our society seem to have an appreciation for the arts. Typically by making or viewing, we also support it financially or by general involvement. Not only is art and artists in museums or concerts, but they are all around us. Art depicts the human experience as a whole.

By simply introducing and mixing the arts into our lives more, we are engaging in not just the arts, but together. The arts acts as an aide and helps foster a community. By thinking creatively, we have the capabilities to make improvements to our community. Artists and arts organizations are an important resource in our path to build stronger connections. These art programs tend to help develop critical skills to function in our society such as critical thinking,communication, focus and discipline as well as social skills.

The impact of the arts in rural locations

Something that we seem to not highlight is how the arts play a crucial role in rural locations. Arts organizations in rural communities provide the community with business opportunities and attraction. For example, the more rural counties that host a performing arts event provide more in terms of scenic and recreational activities. Because of this, visitors and  even locals seem to spend more time participating in these community activities. According to  the national endowment for the arts (NEA), the arts nationally contributed $763.6 billion to the U.S. economy, and $13.6 billion to Michigan’s economy. The NEA also reports how 31% of the rural participants are willing to travel much farther than urban participants which are only at 19%. Basically, the art organizations that attract a non local audience, are raised higher than the urban organizations. As shown on the Arts and economic prosperity Art and cultural events alone contributed $764 billion to the economy in 2015, including a $21 billion international trade. 

Promoting the arts in a community: multiple levels of marketing

It is clear that the arts thrive on community. businesses and organizations that eagerly promote and encourage the arts thrive on the arts in return. By attending these events and participating, we are creating a deeper sense of place for ourselves. According to a local museum director in a rural nh community, In order to promote the arts, you must provide opportunities for community gathering.  Some opportunities are events, workshops, presentations, etc. another typical way to promote is by spreading around the visuals and compelling texts throughout the community.

Creating an exhibit for rural audiences:

When it involves planning art associated events, directors take the concept process all the way into the little details. The title and theme/showcase concept has to connect without delay to surrounding communities ideals. The name and short description used in marketing has to suggest that there can be something the audience will really click with. If the community displays no interest in the description then it is much less probable to succeed. Therefore, it’s imperative you know your audience.

 When choosing formats for presentation for rural audiences, don’t forget what are the smoothest methods to inform the stories within the event/exhibit. Include all senses, all types of media and don’t forget to consider all learning patterns or styles.

 

Connecting communities to content:

If you deliberately create a pathway through the physical experiences, even with tough or complex materials. A goal to keep in mind is that the director/ host of the event should establish a balance of statistics, experience, and proposal. My local museum director discusses how she likes visitors to feel that she planned what the exhibit can do for them. By doing so, the visitors can leave with inspiration, further research, things needed that they can participate in afterwards.

Gaining a Stronger Sense of Community

Over the past few months, I have not only been working on my applied project, but have been pushing my work further at the Museum of the White Mountains. The more time spent on this project, the more I wanted to work with the museum to really see how they have created a community. 

As previously discussed, living in any rural place can be hard, especially for someone like myself who moved from a more urban location. Being so far away from my family can be difficult and before being involved with my local art gallery, I felt lost in this new place. While I had friends from my university, I still felt like I was missing something. I needed a stronger bond and I didn’t really know what that was at the time. 

As my freshman year goes by, I was getting more involved in my art program and spent as much time as I could in the gallery space. I joined several orgs on campus where I was able to meet some amazing mentors which helped me close that void in my chest. While the gallery had closed, luckily for me I was moved to work at the museum where I continued to be with my mentors.

At the museum, I now feel more like a crucial part to their evolution. By starting as a desk attendant, I was able to communicate with visitors at our events and regular business days. I also gained more teaching experience with the groups of classes coming in that I had the opportunity to run.

Because of this project, I learned that the importance of curating these shows were not just financial gain, but each clearly community based. Being able to be behind the scenes of a show before it gets put up helped me understand that it’s not just the museum staff making the work happen, but the community as well. 

Starting over the summer and into semester, I helped create lesson plans and activities for the museum. I researched for designated projects and learned more about the area that New Hampshire calls the white mountains and its art. I started this journey by meeting great people in the art community like authors, professors, artists, musicians, etc.Through these relationships I built not only did I learn a great deal, but I felt like I was truly a part of the community. I grew to love my place at the museum even more because of the strong group I’m surrounded by. I’ve learned that when you create a strong sense of community, amazing things can happen. In reflection, seeing where I am now and looking back to where I started I have grown. This experience has given me many things, but most importantly helped my communication skills, researching, and creative thinking.

Finding Influence

Having a role model helps pave the way of where you want to head next in your own lifework. As a practicing artist at the university, seeking guidance in my professors and peers is a huge part of why I push to create my own work. Without these influences, I wouldn’t be where I am today with my new major and working in a museum. The combination of these influences I believe shapes the work I strive to make. 

For this “finding influence” post, I thought that it would only make sense to discuss Tom Driscoll. Tom is a painter and one of my professors. He has been a consistent mentor with my journey and now I can observe his work in a museum space. Through the pieces he chose I’m able to see some of the teachings from him, applied on his own canvas. This exhibition is currently located at the Museum of the White Mountains and showcases the artists work returning from their sabbatical. 

Looking at the information provided, Tom Driscoll’s sabbatical work is focused on using everyday objects as the subject and places them in a more abstract location or background. Tom always seems to find ways to help us challenge ourselves as we work, he believes pieces can always be pushed further. I believe this is expressed in his own work, working in thick layers through the paintings. Looking at the piece “domestic”, you can clearly see a broom leaning up against a wall. What keeps me engaged with the painting is not only the texture of the piece, but the intense background. The background is an abstract style with brush strokes and mark making that really helps give off a push and pull between the light and dark colors.

I can’t help but reflect on my studio sessions and critiques where Tom would tell us to take risks and break the rules in terms of art. That recurring statement is always in my head and I explored breaking the rules in my own art throughout the years leading to this point. I believe that I truly never understood what he was saying until seeing this painting up close. By allowing himself to take that risk of pushing his background beyond its simple parameters, he probably enjoyed the process even more. What shows me that enjoyed the piece while he was making it is in the brush strokes themselves. At least that’s what I take away from the carefree and vigorous marks made throughout the canvas.This piece promotes some ideas for my work by sending me the message once again, to take risks and break the rules. 

Research Article Outline

Questions I want to address:

I will be answering the following questions through researching databases as well as interviewing a local Arts Director.

  • How to promote the arts in a community?
    • provide opportunities for community gathering- events, workshops, talks, etc
    • spread the visuals and compelling text
    • multiple levels of marketing

 

  • how can you create an exhibit for more people to come to rural locations?
    • the title and exhibit idea has to connect directly to a local community concept or sense of place
    • the title and brief description used in marketing has to suggest that there will be something the audience will understand/value/relate to

 

  • how do you select materials for a rural audience?
    • consider what are the most efficient ways to tell the stories in the exhibit
    • include all senses, all kinds of media
    • consider all learning styles

 

  • what can the community access/connect to?
    • even tough or challenging material can work if you deliberately create a pathway through the physical experiences
    • establish a balance of information, experience, and inspiration
    • I like visitors to feel I have planned what the exhibit can do for them. I like them to leave with ideas of next steps, further research, things needed that they can participate in 

 

Key terms:

  • The importance of art
  • The impact of the arts in rural locations
  • Promoting the arts

Precis


“The Arts as Creative Community Powerhouse.” Harnessing the Bohemian: Artists as Innovation Partners in Rural and Remote Communities, by PETER SKIPPINGTON, ANU Press, Australia, 2016, pp. 253–276. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1q1crpj.17.

 This article chapter gives the reader various scenarios. The scenarios provide examples of how the creative community development a pyramid otherwise known as CCDP. The pyramid has possible practical applications to create new opportunities in order to build a new community capital. The research provided by the article contains critical suggestions for artists, art related workers, and organizations. The various outcomes of the articles research is actively pushing the artist to keep looking into opportunities. The ultimate goal is to engage with the broader community concerns.

 

“Conviction, Connection, Creativity and Courage: A New Model for Creative Community Development.” Harnessing the Bohemian: Artists as Innovation Partners in Rural and Remote Communities, by PETER SKIPPINGTON, ANU Press, Australia, 2016, pp. 215–252. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1q1crpj.16.

This Article chapter discusses how the last two decades of academic literature and a range of popular publications have documented the importance of the role of the arts in community development (Eger, 2003; Goldbard & Adams, 2006; Matarasso, 2001; Phillips, 2004; Psilos & Rapp, 2001; Reeves, 2002; Williams, 1995). The main focus of much of this has been urban and regional development and regeneration. When the subject is contextualised in urban environments, the arts are linked to the enrichment of the quality of life for urban citizens and the enhancement of economic vitality.

 

Fleming, Rachel C. “Creative Economic Development, Sustainability, and Exclusion in Rural Areas.” Geographical Review, vol. 99, no. 1, 2009, pp. 61–80. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/40377366.

Creative economy projects are depicted as appropriate for sustainable rural development, however, the various benefits/ challenges of initiating a creative economy in a rural setting are not properly known. The provided data and qualitative research with artists, planners, and residents of Chatham County, North Carolina, infers that, creative economic development projects can be more effective as economic strategies than as environmental and social justice strategies.The article suggests that difficulties stem from conditions specific to a rural setting, including a particular relationship with landscape, scarce resources for arts-based development, social isolation and fragmentation, different concerns for artists and planners, and the nature of rural gentrification.

 

Lee, Ronald T. “The Expanding Role of the Arts in Education.” Music Educators Journal, vol. 72, no. 2, 1985, pp. 28–33. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3396548.

In the ideal arts education program, the arts are an imperative part of every child’s school day. Ideally, The arts are taught on the same level as disciplines like English, mathematics, and foreign languages. The journal brings up how the arts should not be experienced as embellishments to the curriculum. Nor should they become isolated from the basic subject areas; they are part of the core of the educational program. The arts most commonly include visual arts, music, dance and movement, and theater arts (drama, mime, and pup- petry), but may also include folk art, creative writing, architecture, costume and fashion design, storytelling, and media arts. This emphasis on the arts is based on the premise that the arts are basic to the education of all students. 

Miaoulis, George. “Public Funding of the Arts in New Hampshire.” Journal of Aesthetic Education, vol. 12, no. 1, 1978, pp. 110–113. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3331853.

 Considering the fact that this condensed report only presents highlights of the findings of two exhaustive studies, the data support the conclusion that performing arts and cultural activities have become a rather crucial part of life in New Hampshire as well as in the rest of the states. A growing majority of people are including performing arts and cultural activities in their free time. According to this article, people would like to see an increase in the availability of performing arts and cultural activities in their communities, and understand the importance of supporting these activities through public funding.

Cognitive Biases and Our Everyday Thinking

With everything happening at school, I wanted to take a moment to reflect on an article titled 200 cognitive biases rule our everyday thinking. This article discusses the wide variety of brain biases each individual contains and how they can quickly become “a hall of mirrors”.  We tend to quickly retain information that we think we personally will benefit from the psychological science that’s been done around the cognitive shortcuts.

The article introduces Peter Bauman; a former pioneer of German electronic dance music who now devotes himself to exploring the science and philosophy of the human experience. Peter explains that to him, cognitive biases are everything and nothing simply because there is nothing that is not a bias. We are imbued with cultural assumptions which guides individuals to live in harmony; They are designed to help us survive. Biases do not get in the way of a healthy and/or positive lifestyle.

Baumans favorite bias seems to be the only one that everyone has: Uniqueness. The article explains how we all think of ourselves as “unique” because we are at the center of our own existence.

We as a society, need to fully listen to information. In order to grasp a solid understanding of  the predispositions everyone can provide, we must pay attention. This should help us become more open to understanding other people’s points of view. If you keep a closed mindset and don’t fully listen to other information, then you won’t fully understand other mindsets/ new information.

Creativity in the Workplace

When we are asked to think about where creativity is used and highly encouraged, many are quick to list off places such as: art classes, daycare centers, and performing arts centers. While this is all true, it is just the stereotypical answer. You are expected to be creative and open minded in these locations, we seem to forget another important place; the work place.

As Erik Wahl discusses in his article, Creativity in the workplace is absolutely important. Carrying out the skills learned from those art classes can guide you to a more open mindset. This fresh mindset can strengthen your problem solving and thought process. By applying creative thinking to your work life, that dreadful 9-5 can turn into  more meaningful work. This process is all about taking risks,finding new solutions, and having those great breakthroughs. Why wouldn’t you want to make the most out of your work experiences?